Dr. Bartels was honored as one of the few in the US to become a Master Fastbraces Provider.


Dr. Bartels was honored with The Republic's 20 Under 40 Community Service Award.


Dr. Bartels had the honor of being the key note speaker for graduation at his high school.


Dr. Bartels has completed hundreds of hours of continuing education on Advanced Implant Dentistry


Dr. Bartels' famous artist mother, Patricia Rhoden Bartels, being featured in Homes & Lifestyles Magazine.


Dr. Bartels and wife being featured in Columbus Magazine for Dancing with the Stars and winning Peoples Choice award.


Tipton Lakes Family Dentist being featured for its wonderful care and atmosphere.

Ask The Dentist

I am an adult that works in sales and has crooked teeth that I always think about.  Are there options to straighten adult teeth?

This is an excellent question that many adults ask about.  Having straight teeth is not only a cosmetic concern, but a concern for the function and health of all the teeth.  With today’s technology, dentists are able to provide multiple options to straighten teeth and do so in a short period of time. 

Many children are blessed with nice straight teeth.  Unfortunately, this is not the case with everyone and if they do not have access to getting their teeth straightened as a child many of them become adults with crooked teeth.  The smile is something that most people see first when they talk to someone.  So anyone could understand that if you were an adult with crooked teeth, you would want to straighten them.  I know this because I am a prime example.  As my wisdom teeth started to come in they pushed all my lower front teeth into a crowded mess.

Many adults see this as a cosmetic issue but don’t understand that not having straight teeth is a functional problem as well.  When you chew with your teeth one starts by cutting with their front teeth and then mashing the food with their back teeth.  If any of these teeth are not in alignment uneven forces are applied.  This leads to wearing of teeth, bone loss, and in many cases TMJ problems.  Other results of teeth that are not straight are decay, tarter build-up, and periodontal disease which is the loss of bone.  This is due to lack of access for proper cleaning of all the surfaces of each tooth.  When teeth erupt into the mouth poorly they overlap and create food traps and areas where a toothbrush or floss cannot access.  If you can’t clean those areas, with time, you will develop issues.  This is known as orthodontosis.

Thankfully, there are many options for adults to straighten their teeth.  These options can adapt to any lifestyle or career.  Just a few of these options include retainers, clear aligners, and FastBraces.  Retainers and clear aligners have come a long way and can now be used for many adult concerns with straightening teeth.  The nice thing about these two options is that they work fast and are removable.  Braces have also changed and can be done with clear brackets and some treatment completed in only 4 months; usually having the best results.

The beauty of dentistry today is that there are so many options to choose from to match your lifestyle and desired results.  Many times orthodontics can be paired with veneers to not only straighten teeth, but also shape and whiten them to the desired results.  Please consult with your dentist for options that work best for you.

Regards,

Dr. Christopher Bartels, DDS
Tipton Lakes Family Dentist

 

Ask The Dentist

What happens if I can't save my tooth?

This is a great question and I understand that sometimes a tooth just cannot be saved.  If that is the case and the tooth has to be removed it is very important to have that tooth replaced.  Dentistry has many exceptional options for tooth replacement.  It is important to talk to your dentist prior to tooth extraction about these options so a plan can be properly made and carried out.

When a tooth has a large infection, fracture, or is badly broken down it may have to be pulled, also known as an extraction.  I understand it is a concern of many people to not go without a tooth.  This is very justifyable not only because it does not look the best, but a missing tooth can cause other developments to occure if not filled in a timely manner.  When a tooth is missing the surrounding teeth will shift and drift into spaces that make it difficult to eat, cause damage to the jaw bone, and potentially damage other teeth.  Bone loss, uncommon cavities, and TMJ problems are all associated with tooth loss without replacement.  The amount of time before a permanent solution can be placed will be determined on the reason a tooth has to be extracted and how healthy the surrounding bone is.  In certain situations the permantant solution can be placed at time of extraction.

Prior to extraction it is important to discuss with your dentist what option of tooth replacement works best for you. There are options that are removable and options that are fixed in place.  Depending on what you choose there may have to be some modifications during extraction to contour bone or replace bone with a graft.  One very popular option that is fixed in place is called an implant.  Implants can not be used in every situation and sometimes require modification of the bone.  They are an excellent option for tooth replacement.  Many believe it to be the best option.  An implant acts on its own as the root of the tooth and the top, or crown of the tooth.  The root portion is made of titanium, a metal that the body loves and is used throughout medicine.  This allows the dentist to be conservative with surrounding teeth and save bone from future loss.  The crown of the tooth is made of a porcelain material that looks and feels very natural.  The start to finish time of an implant varies patient to patient.  Sometimes the implant can be placed at the time of extraction but typically it is placed a few months after extraction and can take two to three months for the final crown to be placed.  No matter the situation, a temporary retainer can be used if there are cosmetic concerns of missing a tooth for several months.  This temporary retainer can usually be made within 24-48 hours.  Implants continue to grow in popularity as dental awareness and education of the benefits of implants are more recognized.  If you have any further questions please visit our website at www.TLDentist.com

Regards,

Dr. Christopher L. Bartels, DDS
Tipton Lakes Family Dentist

 

Ask The Dentist

I saw an advertisement for "painless" dentistry.  Can it really be painless?

This is an excellent question and a primary concern for many patients.  Words like “pain,” “hurt,” “bad taste,” and “scary” are associated with the dentist but it does not have to be this way.  Modern dentistry has changed dramatically from when we were kids and continues to change daily.  It is important to find a dentist that is keeping up with these advancements to provide the best of care with a gentle hand.

The word “shot” comes to mind when people first mention the dentist.  In fact, many of you reading this probably cringe a little when the “s” word is mentioned.  Giving patients an anesthetic, or a shot, is still common practice in dentistry and is required for most treatment.  The good news is that advanced techniques, anesthetic, and numbing medicines applied to the surface of the gums now allow patients to get numb faster with less anesthetic, smaller needles, and better pre-numbing of the gums.  This allows the dentist to provide better numbness with less pain.  Adding calming agents such as nitrous or even sedation with oral medications can make the visit to the dentist feel like it never happened.

The dental drill is another common word that patients don’t like to say.  The dental drill is used to remove decay and prepare teeth for restorations.  Once again technology has allowed the dentist to provide restorations with less use of the dental drill and sometimes no use.  Cosmetic procedures, like veneers, can be accomplished many times without even drilling on the teeth.  Air abrasion can also be used on children and small fillings without having to use a drill or give much or any anesthetic.

Whenever I mention that a patient needs a root canal they look at me like I gave them a death wish, but honestly the majority of patients fall asleep when I am doing root canals.  Dentists are able to complete root canals with more ease, better materials, and at a faster appointment time than ever before.  This makes a root canal a very straightforward procedure for the patient.  Many patients request any other work they may need, such as the final crown, to be completed at the same visit because of the short time and ease of completion. 

These are just a few of the wonderful advancements in the world of dentistry.  Unfortunately I would be lying if I were to say dentistry was totally painless.  However, with growing technology and better treatment options the dentist can continue to provide patients with the best of care while decreasing the number of scary words.

Regards,

Dr. Christopher Bartels, DDS
Tipton Lakes Family Dentist

 

Ask The Expert

What is the best type of fillings to get in my mouth?

This is an excellent question and it’s difficult to give a direct answer.  I will educate you on the two types of fillings along with an indirect method that many people do not know of.  I suggest discussing these options with your dental care provider to determine what works best for you. 

Silver fillings are known as amalgam fillings.  They are composed of a mixture of metals and other elements that are then packed into the area where the cavity was removed.  They are mechanically held in place by the preparation of the tooth.  Amalgam fillings have been around for a long time and are a proven and successful treatment for tooth decay. 

Tooth colored fillings are known as composite fillings.  They are composed of a mixture of composite, almost like a plastic.  Composite fillings are chemically bonded to the tooth.  Composite fillings have been around for several decades and have now become the more popular form of treatment for tooth decay since they are white in color and bond to the tooth for added strength.  It is not necessary to have amalgam fillings replaced unless there is something either wrong with the filling or with the tooth that would require a fix. 

Some offices, like ours, try to provide a metal free treatment plan for patients.  With devices such as CAD CAM (computer-aided design computer-aided manufacturing) dentistry, we can make restorations for patients that are all porcelain with no metal and can be made in one visit.  CAD CAM dentistry is growing in popularity as more dentists become equipped with these machines.  A CAD CAM restoration does not require an impression.  A special camera or laser is used to scan the tooth preparation.  A mill in the office is then used to make the restoration which can then be placed into the mouth.  This form of indirect restoration allows the dentist to fabricate a more custom restoration that looks more natural and is still metal free.

It is important to go through the options with your dental provider to fully understand the benefits of all your options.  Each office is different and does not always offer what you are looking for.

Regards,

Dr. Christopher L. Bartels, DDS
Tipton Lakes Family Dentist

 

Ask The Expert

Is chewing gum bad for my teeth?

This is a great question and a part of most children’s and adults’ daily activities.  It can be answered in a couple different ways.  On a broader note, anything with sugar will cause cavities.  Carbohydrates feed the bacteria that create cavities in teeth.  Many foods have these sugar carbs and it takes active parents to evaluate what children eat on a daily basis to develop good habits as adults.  With the help of education and new candy options, children and adults can make healthier choices.

                Until recent years gum was considered a candy and rightly so.  Gum, like all candy, consisted mostly of sugar.  Its stickiness also made it a double threat to the health of teeth.  Sticky sweet sugar gets in the grooves and crevices of teeth and feed all the bacteria.  This quickly develops into cavities.  Sugary beverages, like soda, act the same way and can develop cavities in a matter of months.  Even if fillings are placed in these areas, more cavities can quickly develop if habits are not changed.

                Thankfully many companies have realized the detriment sugar causes to the teeth and body and have started to make changes.  Sugar alternatives, such as Xylitol, are now being used to sweeten gum without feeding the cavity-forming bacteria.  Gum made with these sugar alternatives is actually now considered beneficial.  Instead of a candy that feeds bacteria, it is now a cleaning aid to remove food debris and stimulate saliva production.  The sticky substance of gum sticks to the foods that are in the grooves and crevices and help to clean the teeth.  The movement of chewing naturally stimulates saliva production which also acts as a cleansing aid to the teeth.

                A simple change in ingredients changes gum from being a sticky, problematic candy to a daily cleansing aid in oral hygiene.  This also holds true for many other forms of candy.  Not every option even has to be a sugar alternative.  Natural ingredients, such as honey, have a high sweetness but do not feed bacteria as much as ingredients like high-fructose corn syrup.  So, when making a selection for your next sweet fix, look for the sugar-free alternatives.  Not only does it help the teeth, it is also beneficial in controlling spikes in blood sugar and potential diabetes, a quickly growing disease in American children.

                It is important to talk to your dentist and hygienist at your regular visits about your daily food habits.  As your doctor, it is important to be a part of your decision making process and educate you in what is best for your body.  Dentistry goes far beyond cleaning teeth and filling cavities.  The mouth is the entrance to your entire body.  If you have any more questions about food options or sugar alternatives please visit us at www.TLDentist.com

Regards,

Dr. Christopher Bartels, DDS
Tipton Lakes Family Dentist

 

Ask The Dentist

Question: How does ultrasonic plaque removal work and how does it compare to the traditional method?

This is a great question and one that is commonly asked by our patients.  Traditional and ultrasonic plaque removal techniques are both frequently used in a dental office to clean teeth and manage periodontal disease. The difference between the two techniques is dictated by the types of instruments used when performing the cleaning. Each method has its own advantages and disadvantages, but often times works best when used together.

In our mouth there are both good and bad bacteria. These bacteria are in a constant tug-of-war, with each side poised to pounce if given the chance. The more carbohydrate and sugar we eat, the greater the balance shifts in favor of our bad bacteria. These bad bacteria consume the sugar and produce acid that contribute to the buildup of dental plaque, a white/yellow, slimy film that sticks to our teeth. If left unchecked the dental plaque will continue to grow in size, harden and turn into what is commonly known as dental tartar or calculus. The calculus over time will creep under the gums and can cause serious damage to the surrounding gums, teeth and even the underlying bones in our mouth. Unfortunately calculus is nearly impossible to remove with a toothbrush or flossing (think of it like trying to remove barnacles from the bottom of a ship) and its presence is a good indicator that is time to visit your local family dentist. 

The process of removing plaque and calculus is often referred to as scaling and root planing. It may also be called deep cleaning. If we talk about the ‘traditional method’ of scaling and root planing it commonly involves using specialized instruments called hand scalers to manually remove the plaque/calculus above and below the gums. On the other hand, ultrasonic scalers are basically an electrical version of the hand scalers. The tips of ultrasonic scalers are designed to vibrate at a very high frequency, allowing effective removal of plaque and calculus. Ultrasonic scalers have been shown to have a slight advantage over hand instruments at treating periodontal disease. Their action not only removes the calculus, but is also able to target bacteria under the gums and flush away debris during the cleaning process. The indication for using hand versus ultrasonic scalers should be based on the needs and desires of the individual patient.

In our experience at Tipton Lakes Family Dentist, using a combination of hand instruments, ultrasonic scalers and patient education during the appointment has shown to be the most effective way to manage periodontal disease.  Ultrasonic scalers are used to remove the larger, more aggressive plaque and calculus. The same areas would then be meticulously scaled with the hand instruments to ensure that all of the plaque and calculus have been thoroughly removed. The patient would then be provided with a comprehensive oral hygiene program for home that includes proper brushing and flossing techniques, to ensure that the teeth remain healthy and clean for years to come.

Regards,

Dr. Christopher L. Bartels, DDS
Tipton Lakes Family Dentist

 

Ask The Dentist

I meet a lot of people with shoulder, neck, head, or TMJ pain.  Is there anything besides pills that can relieve these headaches?

Headache: a word that makes some people shudder.  Migraine: a word that makes some people fall to their knees.  Millions of Americans battle headaches and migraines daily.  Most go on living their lives, taking over-the-counter or doctor-prescribed drugs.  Some search out an answer, going from doctor to doctor, many times just getting by with prescribed drugs once again.  Pain of the head, neck, and TMJ affect more than 25% of the population.  Studies suggest that up to 85% of the TMJ/ facial pain disorders are muscle related.  What if treating the muscle trigger points with Botox would relieve your pain?

Trigger points are areas of pain where muscles form “knots.”  These are the painful yet wonderful spots your favorite massage therapist finds to break up and relax.  The main muscles in the head and neck start at the shoulders, go up the back of the neck, and attach to the skull.  Many trigger points can be found along this path and can send pain up the back of the head and travel to the front and side, many times ending above or behind the eyes.  The main muscles used for chewing start on the lower jaw and travel all the way up to the side of the head in the temporal region.  Trigger points along this path can send pain to the side of the head, ear, and even into the teeth.

A facial pain specialist is someone who has extensive training in the nerves and muscles of the head and neck.  By using extensive diagnosis techniques, it is their goal to pinpoint the cause of the pain and treat it.  One very favorable and successful form of treatment is Botox trigger point injections.  By breaking up the “knots” and injecting Botox, the patient can have almost immediate relief.  It is truly amazing to see and even more amazing to feel these effects.  I know this first-hand because I have had all the pain described above.  When I had my first trigger point injections I could not believe the difference it made.

I understand the fact that head, neck, and facial pain can wear on a person.  Taking prescription drugs can be an answer, but these medications do not focus on the direct cause of the pain. A muscle directed medicine (like Botox) may be another remedy to look into.  If you have any further questions on head, neck, or facial pain please contact your family physician, dentist, or contact Dr. Christopher Bartels at Tipton Lakes Family Dentist.

 Regards,

Christopher L. Bartels, DDS
Tipton Lakes Family Dentist

 

Ask The Expert

Question: How does ultrasonic plaque removal work and how does it compare to the traditional method?

 This is a great question and one that is commonly asked by our patients.  Traditional and ultrasonic plaque removal techniques are both frequently used in a dental office to clean teeth and manage periodontal disease. The difference between the two techniques is dictated by the types of instruments used when performing the cleaning. Each method has its own advantages and disadvantages, but often times works best when used together.

In our mouth there are both good and bad bacteria. These bacteria are in a constant tug-of-war, with each side poised to pounce if given the chance. The more carbohydrate and sugar we eat, the greater the balance shifts in favor of our bad bacteria. These bad bacteria consume the sugar and produce acid that contribute to the buildup of dental plaque, a white/yellow, slimy film that sticks to our teeth. If left unchecked the dental plaque will continue to grow in size, harden and turn into what is commonly known as dental tartar or calculus. The calculus over time will creep under the gums and can cause serious damage to the surrounding gums, teeth and even the underlying bones in our mouth. Unfortunately calculus is nearly impossible to remove with a toothbrush or flossing (think of it like trying to remove barnacles from the bottom of a ship) and its presence is a good indicator that is time to visit your local family dentist. 

The process of removing plaque and calculus is often referred to as scaling and root planing. It may also be called deep cleaning. If we talk about the ‘traditional method’ of scaling and root planing it commonly involves using specialized instruments called hand scalers to manually remove the plaque/calculus above and below the gums. On the other hand, ultrasonic scalers are basically an electrical version of the hand scalers. The tips of ultrasonic scalers are designed to vibrate at a very high frequency, allowing effective removal of plaque and calculus. Ultrasonic scalers have been shown to have a slight advantage over hand instruments at treating periodontal disease. Their action not only removes the calculus, but is also able to target bacteria under the gums and flush away debris during the cleaning process. The indication for using hand versus ultrasonic scalers should be based on the needs and desires of the individual patient.

In our experience at Tipton Lakes Family Dentist, using a combination of hand instruments, ultrasonic scalers and patient education during the appointment has shown to be the most effective way to manage periodontal disease.  Ultrasonic scalers are used to remove the larger, more aggressive plaque and calculus. The same areas would then be meticulously scaled with the hand instruments to ensure that all of the plaque and calculus have been thoroughly removed. The patient would then be provided with a comprehensive oral hygiene program for home that includes proper brushing and flossing techniques, to ensure that the teeth remain healthy and clean for years to come.

Regards,

Dr. Christopher L. Bartels, DDS
Tipton Lakes Family Dentist

 

Ask The Dentist

Is there anything else that can be used instead of a drill?

This is a great question and a dream for not only patients but also dentists.  Currently, using a dental handpiece or what’s commonly known as a dental drill is the primary way to removed decay from a tooth.  Other forms of decay removal are available but not used as a mainstream treatment due to their inefficiency to remove tooth structure at a speed necessary for patient comfort and office schedules.

When most people think about going to the dentist it brings some anxiety with it.  Some people are afraid of shots, the dental chair, or the sound of the drill.  The technology in dentistry is changing daily and where we are today is leaps and bounds farther than where we were even ten years ago.  Many of these advancements are in the ease and quality of being able to get a patient numb and the improved quality of the dental materials used.  Dentists are now able to get patients numb faster, easier, and have the numbness last longer.  Dentists are also able to provide tooth restorations that look better, last longer, and have less metal than ever before.

Two alternative ways to remove dental decay are hard tissue lasers and air abrasion handpieces.  Both of these options have great potential for the future.  Air abrasion is currently used in our office for small cavities in children and adults.  It uses small particles to blast away tooth decay, almost like a sand blaster.  It allows me to remove decay without having to get the patient numb in many cases.  The downside is that it is messy and it is slower than using a dental drill.  Lasers are used in some offices.  They work by causing microscopic explosions in the tooth to remove decay.  Once again they can many times be used without having to get a patient numb.  This process is also slow.

It is difficult to tell the future of dentistry but as long as one can dream, the options are endless.  If you were to go back even twenty years and ask a dentist if they would be placing implants, making crowns in their office, or even be able to keep a patient numb for a whole appointment with just a small amount of anesthetic, they probably would have thought these ideas were crazy.  Dentistry is changing daily.  It is important for dentists to stay up-to-date with these changes to provide patients with the best of care.

Regards,

Dr. Christopher L. Bartels, DDS
Tipton Lakes Family Dentist



Ask The Dentist

What is a dead or infected tooth and what should be done about it?

There are several reasons for having a dead or infected tooth. The most common are dental caries (cavities), severe periodontal disease, tooth fracture or tooth trauma. A tooth is considered to be dead or infected when bacteria invades into the tooth nerve. It often starts as a cavity that eventually finds its way into the center of the tooth where it affects the nerve. The nerve then dies, releasing its contents and causing formation of gases that collect within the tooth, called pus. This process can be acute or chronic in nature. Acute infection results in swelling, abscess and severe throbbing pain. Chronic infection can be seen in a patient who has passed the acute phase. Chronic infection might not show any swelling but there is constant discharge of pus or exudates with discomfort or dull pain.

Infection is a cluster of disease that causes microorganisms to damage the normal body structure. Tooth infection can be an easy source for bacteria to enter the bloodstream, resulting in bacteremia. These bacteria can then form a new cluster at any part of the body, resulting in secondary infection. Bacteria can also settle down in any organ of the body such as the heart, liver, etc causing infection in that organ. Leaving a dead or infected tooth untreated leads to constant pain, foul smell, discomfort, compromised oral hygiene and bacteremia.

There are different treatment options for a dead or infected tooth. Removing the infected tooth is one common option. Getting the right treatment for a dead or infected tooth would not only relieve pain and discomfort but also restore a healthy mouth and eliminate the chance of bacteremia. Patients will start feeling the difference immediately after getting appropriate care for a dead or infected tooth. Regular dental visits, maintaining adequate oral hygiene and getting dental cavities filled can prevent a tooth from getting infected or dead.

Not all dead or infected teeth need to be removed. There are treatment options available to save and retain teeth in some cases. Ask your dentist if that’s the right option for your dead or infected tooth. Several treatment options for replacing a missing tooth or several teeth include partial denture, dental bridge or dental implants. Only your dentist can provide you with the right option for your dead or infected tooth.

 Regards,

Dr Christopher Bartels, DDS
Tipton Lakes Family Dentist

 


Ask The Dentist

How does dental education and home care differ in the US vs other countries and why it is important to take dental care seriously?

I think dentistry differs from country to country. Each place has its own philosophy on practicing dentistry. Several factors play a role like culture, lifestyle, economical status, education, mindset, etc. Most of the time people in developing countries think going to a dentist is only necessary when there is pain. This might be because of lack of dental education and awareness and/or financial conditions. Waiting for pain to see a dentist might be too late. Many dental diseases are not painful in their initial or moderate stage.

Dental caries (cavities) are painless unless the nerve is involved. Initial or moderate gum and bone disease surrounding the teeth (periodontal disease) are not usually painful for patients. Many people in developing countries avoid going to the dentist because they are not in pain. This makes the situation worse for the dentist and often requires extensive and costly procedures in order to save the teeth. It may even require extracting teeth.

If patients neglect regular dental checkups, they could already have dental disease in its initial or moderate stage and be completely unaware. In this case, if the dentist suggests treatment that is not related to painful teeth, patients may think treatments are unnecessary. Dentistry seems to be more symptomatic than preventive in these countries and this means dentistry is more related to pain then maintaining oral health. Dental caries and advanced periodontal disease are quite common in these people because they were not visiting a dentist on any type of regular basis. Infrequent dental visits, lack of dental awareness and neglecting adequate oral hygiene habits diminishes home dental care in these countries and leads to several chronic dental conditions.

The situation is different in the U.S. People have more awareness about their mouth and teeth. They know the importance of visiting a dentist on a regular basis to keep up with their oral health. This allows the dentist the chance for early identification of any possible emerging dental disease. Frequent visits and interaction with their dentist make patients more aware about dental home care and ways to maintain oral hygiene.

Regular monitoring of the oral cavity helps identify any early signs of dental caries, periodontal disease or warning signs of emerging oral cancer. Patients can stay on top of the health of their mouth and teeth by visiting their dentist at least every 6 months. Oral care instructions might differ depending on patient, so it is very important for you to ask dentist during your regular visit about how you can maintain a healthy smile.

By:
Dr. Brijesh Patel, BDS DDS
Tipton Lakes Family Dentist

Ask The Dentist

What technology exists in dentistry today?

                This is a great question and is an area of tremendous change.  I could probably predict some new dental technology will be invented by the time I finish this article.  The truth is dentistry today can be completed faster, easier, and with less pain than ever before.  As with every other aspect of our lives technology is hot on the move.  It provides numerous benefits to the patient and the doctor but needs to be monitored to provide the patient with the best care.  Technology is a tool in a tool box that has to all be working together.

                Let’s start with everyone’s least favorite part of dentistry; the shot and the drill.  Many readers probably cringe at the sound of those two words.  Thankfully with the help of new topical anesthetics, much smaller needles, electric drills, and drilling alternatives we are able to make patients much more comfortable while completing their treatment faster.  In fact, many children and adults can have treatment completed without a shot in a matter of minutes.  Hard to believe, I know, but dentists have so many great ways to get treatment done.

Now let’s talk about convenience.  Time is everyone’s enemy but technology is here to save the day.  It is amazing that we are able to tell a patient that we can complete a majority of their dental care in a short single visit.  One visit crowns, implants, and whitening are just a few of the great treatments offered in office.  With the use of digital technology, CAD CAM technology, and smaller faster equipment time is not an enemy.

                These great dental technologies continue into the diagnosing and treatment planning for patients as well.  With digital x-rays dentists are not only able to use many imaging tools to diagnose but are also able to show patients in a way they can understand better.  Patient education has never been easier.  Intraoral cameras are used to snap quick pictures in the mouth to show on a computer to the patient.  Videos are played to educate them about dental care and oral health.  Lasers help aide dentists in finding cavities when needed. 

But, don’t let technology take over.  It is very important to use technology as a tool in a tool box.  If used improperly or without proper judgment it can become unfaithful.  Find a dental home that stays up-to-date with technology and loves what they do.  These are just a few of the great new dental technologies.  If you have any dental questions regarding other technology not discussed we are happy to help.

Regards,

Dr. Christopher L. Bartels, DDS
Tipton Lakes Family Dentist

 

Ask The Dentist

Q:      Is Botox the right treatment for me and my migraines?

A:      Migraines are notoriously tricky to treat. Treating migraines is often trial and error. Sometimes a lifestyle change is in order, such as less stress and more sleep. More often than not, this is not enough to rid patients of their migraines.

This is where Botox comes into play. Botox is FDA approved. Botox works in about 60% of people, in comparison to other headache drugs; it is twice as effective. Botox is the only FDA-approved, preventive treatment for adults with Chronic Migraines. Chronic Migraines are determined by how many headaches you get a month (14 or more are considered chronic) and therefore make Botox a possibility for you. Botox prevents up to 9 headache days a month (vs. up to 7 for placebo).

Botox is made from a toxin produced by a bacterium called Clostridium Botulinum. It is the same toxin that causes botulism; a rare food borne illness that causes paralysis. The injection that is given is an incredibly tiny amount of the toxin and is generally safer than any dental injections. There has not been a confirmed serious case of spread of toxin effect away from the injection site when Botox has been used at the recommended dose to treat chronic migraine.

Botox works by dampening signals from the nerves to the muscles. The injected muscle relaxes and is unable to contract. Therefore relieving any tightened muscles that would cause a migraine to occur this is only a minor player in migraine relief. The leading theory is that Botox quiets down the chemicals that cause inflammation and migraine pain. Botulinum toxin inhibits pain in chronic migraine by reducing the expression of certain pain pathways involving nerve cells in the trigeminovascular system. The trigeminovascular system is a sensory pathway thought to play a key role in the headache phase of a migraine attack.

Botox may take up to two weeks to work, although some patients may notice a difference after just a few days. With each treatment patients do better but it tends to wear off around three months and will need to be re-treated. Botox has a cumulative effect, each treatment patients do better than the last. The choice of 12 weeks between treatments with Botox for chronic migraine is largely based on the pivotal research studies that were used to gain its treatment approval. In day-to-day clinical headache practice it is not unusual to vary the duration between Botox treatments in some patients. Areas injected include the bridge of the nose, the forehead, the temples, the back of the head, the neck, and the upper back (above the shoulder blades).

Some cosmetic benefit may be noticed such as the smoothing and the disappearance for the "angry 11's" or lines between the eyebrows. Some patient may not want any hint of cosmetic effect in which case the forehead is avoided completely.

For more information please feel free to contact us at Tipton Lakes Family Dentist & Spa Bella (812)342-3969.

Regards,

Dr. Christopher L. Bartels, DDS
Tipton Lakes Family Dentist

 

 

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